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Entries in Child Abuse (36)

Friday
Aug192016

A Single Father's Story of Alienation

Up until March 27th 2011, I shared a wonderful strong and happy bond with my then 7 year old boy, since the day he was born.

I was never married to his mother, I am 9 years younger than her and our relationship ended prior to her pregnancy.

Without moving into too much detail, the mother and I had a telephone dispute over horseplay games my son and I played. In particular, our routine little wrestling games on the bed each morning and night.

On March after drop off she called me to say there were bite marks on my son's arm. She was yelling, I was a little confused, but narrowed it down to perhaps part of our game where he and I would see how long we could hold. I tried to calm her down, instead she said she was taking photos and said that 'this was abuse'.

This became a screaming match as I would never, ever do anything to harm my son. The last time I saw him, he was singing in the car and said, "I love you Dad".

Even that night in question, "He did not complain to his mother of anything". But, the worst when she began yelling on the phone in his presence and from there on, she was about to emotionally and psychologically abuse my son forever...

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Tuesday
Sep092014

Men’s Research Study (sexual abuse by a biological mother)

A researcher at the University of Canberra is collecting information from Australian males about males’ experiences seeking and/or receiving counselling for sexual abuse by a biological mother.

This research has been given approval by the University of Canberra’s Committee on Ethical Human Research.

This is a 40-question, online survey.

Your response will be anonymous, and only seen by the researcher and research supervisors.

Practitioners are invited to complete a questionnaire online at http://canberra.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3PH3S8VTl59n5xH. The online survey is now open, until 12 December 2014. This survey focuses on practitioners background and approach to counselling males.

Males who have been sexually abused (possibly still undisclosed) and sought and/or received counselling support are invited to complete their own questionnaire online at http://canberra.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_1zd1ZwJetVexXud. New questions have been added to this survey, as suggested by male victims of sexual assault.

Open from 22 July 2014.

Being part of this research is your choice.

Monday
May122014

Share your story: A safer future for children

The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse is investigating how institutions like schools, churches, sports clubs and government organisations have responded to allegations and instances of child sexual abuse.

In its first 16 months of operation, the Royal Commission has travelled to every state and territory of Australia including many regional areas, to hear from more than 1,500 people in private sessions. The Royal Commission’s call centre has received over 11,000 phone calls from the public and held 11 public hearings.  

Historical data suggests that males were more likely to be sexually abused in institutions than females, and males were also likely to take more than five years longer to report that abuse. 

If you were sexually abused as a child while in the care of an institution in Australia you can share your story with the Royal Commission. It doesn’t matter how young or old you are, or how long ago the abuse occurred, every person’s story is important.

The first step is to let the Royal Commission know that you are interested in sharing your story.

Call: 1800 099 340 between the hours of 8am and 8pm from Monday to Friday

Email: Send an email to contact@childabuseroyalcommission.gov.au

Write: GPO Box 5283, Sydney, NSW 2001.

Discussing child sexual abuse can be difficult. The Royal Commission can refer survivors of child sexual abuse to counsellors or special support groups. 

For more information about the work of the Royal Commission and support services available visit www.childabuseroyalcommission.gov.au or call 1800 099 340.

 

Monday
Jul152013

Child sex abuse rampant in Afghanistan, documentary shows | Toronto Star (Canada)

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Supplied photo

A screengrab from a documentary called This is What Winning Looks Like, produced by Ben Anderson. The film looks at the practice of bacha bazi, or "boy play", in Afghanistan.

U.S. Marine Maj. Bill Steuber, like most people in Afghanistan’s southern Helmand province, knew that local Afghan police were keeping young boys as sex slaves.

The practice, known as bacha bazi, or “boy play,” was an open secret in Sangin, a town of 14,000 in Helmand.

So Steuber sat down to confront deputy police chief Qhattab Khan, hoping he could convince him that the practice — which is as illegal in Afghanistan as it is in Canada — would cost the police the support of the local community.

But what Steuber heard left him shaking his head in disbelief.

During their meeting in November 2012, Steuber said, Khan mocked the idea that his men shouldn’t have sex with the boys. Without the boys, Khan said, using graphic language, his men would be left with few options other than their own grandmothers.

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Saturday
Aug182012

Male, presumed dangerous

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Battling stereotypes … preschool worker Craig d'Arcy has set up the Males in Early Childhood Network Group. Photo: Greg Mace

As a young man eager to get into a boom industry with a robust future, Craig d'Arcy spent several years as the only male studying childcare alongside more than 100 women at TAFE and university in Newcastle.

Early in his career, his childcare centre boss told him parents had highlighted in yellow on their child's enrolment form they wanted no male worker to go near their offspring. Two decades on, as founder of the national Males in Early Childhood Network Group, d'Arcy has heard about centres that ban men from changing nappies and is used to people thinking those who want to work with the young are either gay or have evil intent.

So he easily recognised the vein of fear about male contact with children that popped up when two men went public recently about their embarrassment over airline staff moving them away from unaccompanied minors.

"The stereotype is that men are predators who are looking for opportunities to abuse young children," says d'Arcy, who is co-ordinator of a Mullumbimby preschool and has six children of his own. "There seems to be that automatic assumption."

Most of the 2900 men who make their living caring for under-fives butt up against these assumptions regularly in a way that their 100,000-plus female counterparts do not, he says.

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