Navigation

Entries in Domestic (Intimate Partner) Violence (147)

Friday
Aug192016

A Single Father's Story of Alienation

Up until March 27th 2011, I shared a wonderful strong and happy bond with my then 7 year old boy, since the day he was born.

I was never married to his mother, I am 9 years younger than her and our relationship ended prior to her pregnancy.

Without moving into too much detail, the mother and I had a telephone dispute over horseplay games my son and I played. In particular, our routine little wrestling games on the bed each morning and night.

On March after drop off she called me to say there were bite marks on my son's arm. She was yelling, I was a little confused, but narrowed it down to perhaps part of our game where he and I would see how long we could hold. I tried to calm her down, instead she said she was taking photos and said that 'this was abuse'.

This became a screaming match as I would never, ever do anything to harm my son. The last time I saw him, he was singing in the car and said, "I love you Dad".

Even that night in question, "He did not complain to his mother of anything". But, the worst when she began yelling on the phone in his presence and from there on, she was about to emotionally and psychologically abuse my son forever...

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Jun092015

Men Say YES to Family Peace

Help end all violence against women, men, children and animals

We are living in a society that is in the midst of an epidemic of domestic violence and during Men’s Health Week this month it is time that men unite to SAY YES to Family Peace and start to put in place actions for ending all violence against women, men, children and animals. 

Whilst violence in our community affects all ages and genders, there has very understandably been an emphasis placed on raising awareness of violence against women because two-thirds of the victims of domestic violence in Australia are women.  As a result, many people tend to think of domestic violence as something that happens to women perpetrated by men only - but this is not the case. Both men and women are capable of violence in relationships. Domestic violence against men is under-studied, under-reported and they become the hidden victims of domestic violence. 

Click to read more ...

Friday
Apr172015

The Guardian Australia corrects domestic violence article

In an article titled "Quentin Bryce urges focus on gender inequality to tackle domestic violence", published on April 6th, Guardian journalist Melissa Davey claimed that "Two women are killed through domestic violence in Australia every week, and it is also the leading preventable cause of injury and death in women under 45, according to VicHealth".

Men's Health Australia wrote to the Guardian explaining the following:

  • The latest data from the Australian Institute of Criminology found that, during the period 2010 to 2012, 121 females were killed by an offender with whom they shared a domestic relationship (1.2 per week). This rate would have to almost double to reach the two per week claim made by Davey.
  • The VicHealth data is also seriously misrepresented. They found that intimate partner violence is the biggest contributor to ill health and premature death in women aged 15–44. 82% of this burden of disease was from poor mental health (depression and anxiety) and substance abuse, while just 2.3% was from homicide and 0.7% from physical injury. The leading cause of death for Australian women 15-44 years is malignant neoplasms, and the leading cause of injury is "other unintentional injuries".

Congratulations are due to the Guardian, who have now corrected the article in question.

The article now reads as follows:

"On average at least one woman is killed as a result of domestic violence in Australia every week, and it is the biggest contributor to preventable ill-health and premature death in women under 45, according to VicHealth."

The Guardian also published a footnote reading:

"This article was amended on 16 April to correct the reported rate at which women are killed by intimate partners. Women die this way in Australia at the rate of slightly more than one a week, according to Australian Institute of Criminology statistics – 109 in 2010-11 and 2011-12 combined. Unofficial figures for the first few months of 2015 show a similar rate."

Click to read more ...

Monday
Sep152014

One third of domestic violence victims denied services

Following last week’s launch of Our Watch – a new national initiative aimed to prevent violence against women and their children – the One in Three Campaign has released a new analysis of the latest Australian data on male victims of family violence.

Senior Researcher Greg Andresen said, “We are very glad to see violence against women being taken so seriously by the Australian Government. However we are extremely concerned that one third of victims of sexual assault and family violence are excluded by Our Watch and its sister organisation ANROWS simply on the basis of their gender.”

The analysis of the ABS Personal Safety Survey and the AIC Homicide in Australia, 2008–10, published today by One in Three, challenges the claim that the vast majority of family violence is committed by men against women and children. Using the same data sources as Fact Sheets recently released by ANROWS, the new data analysis paints a very different picture of gender and family violence in Australia.

Click to read more ...

Saturday
Jun072014

Preventing and Responding to Sexual and Domestic Violence against Men - A Guidance Note for Security Sector Institutions

Large numbers of men are subjected to Sexual and Domestic Violence (SDV). For example, official statistics from Australia estimate that 336,000 men (4 per cent of the male population) have been victims of sexual violence and 448,000 men (5.3 per cent) have been subjected to partner violence since they turned 15 years old. Male victims often share similar security needs with female victims. However, there are also gender-specific barriers to accessing security and justice, and the issue of SDV remains especially shrouded in silence and misconceptions when it comes to male victims. A literature review indicated that while academic research on these topics does exist and several NGOs have recorded relevant good practices, there is currently no single document where this information is synthesised in such a way that it can be readily used by the security sector. This guidance note is therefore designed to serve as a tool to enable security sector institutions to provide a more effective gender-sensitive approach to preventing and responding to SDV against men.

Click to read more ...