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Entries in Family Violence (54)

Tuesday
Jun092015

Men Say YES to Family Peace

Help end all violence against women, men, children and animals

We are living in a society that is in the midst of an epidemic of domestic violence and during Men’s Health Week this month it is time that men unite to SAY YES to Family Peace and start to put in place actions for ending all violence against women, men, children and animals. 

Whilst violence in our community affects all ages and genders, there has very understandably been an emphasis placed on raising awareness of violence against women because two-thirds of the victims of domestic violence in Australia are women.  As a result, many people tend to think of domestic violence as something that happens to women perpetrated by men only - but this is not the case. Both men and women are capable of violence in relationships. Domestic violence against men is under-studied, under-reported and they become the hidden victims of domestic violence. 

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Friday
Apr172015

The Guardian Australia corrects domestic violence article

In an article titled "Quentin Bryce urges focus on gender inequality to tackle domestic violence", published on April 6th, Guardian journalist Melissa Davey claimed that "Two women are killed through domestic violence in Australia every week, and it is also the leading preventable cause of injury and death in women under 45, according to VicHealth".

Men's Health Australia wrote to the Guardian explaining the following:

  • The latest data from the Australian Institute of Criminology found that, during the period 2010 to 2012, 121 females were killed by an offender with whom they shared a domestic relationship (1.2 per week). This rate would have to almost double to reach the two per week claim made by Davey.
  • The VicHealth data is also seriously misrepresented. They found that intimate partner violence is the biggest contributor to ill health and premature death in women aged 15–44. 82% of this burden of disease was from poor mental health (depression and anxiety) and substance abuse, while just 2.3% was from homicide and 0.7% from physical injury. The leading cause of death for Australian women 15-44 years is malignant neoplasms, and the leading cause of injury is "other unintentional injuries".

Congratulations are due to the Guardian, who have now corrected the article in question.

The article now reads as follows:

"On average at least one woman is killed as a result of domestic violence in Australia every week, and it is the biggest contributor to preventable ill-health and premature death in women under 45, according to VicHealth."

The Guardian also published a footnote reading:

"This article was amended on 16 April to correct the reported rate at which women are killed by intimate partners. Women die this way in Australia at the rate of slightly more than one a week, according to Australian Institute of Criminology statistics – 109 in 2010-11 and 2011-12 combined. Unofficial figures for the first few months of 2015 show a similar rate."

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Monday
Sep152014

One third of domestic violence victims denied services

Following last week’s launch of Our Watch – a new national initiative aimed to prevent violence against women and their children – the One in Three Campaign has released a new analysis of the latest Australian data on male victims of family violence.

Senior Researcher Greg Andresen said, “We are very glad to see violence against women being taken so seriously by the Australian Government. However we are extremely concerned that one third of victims of sexual assault and family violence are excluded by Our Watch and its sister organisation ANROWS simply on the basis of their gender.”

The analysis of the ABS Personal Safety Survey and the AIC Homicide in Australia, 2008–10, published today by One in Three, challenges the claim that the vast majority of family violence is committed by men against women and children. Using the same data sources as Fact Sheets recently released by ANROWS, the new data analysis paints a very different picture of gender and family violence in Australia.

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Tuesday
Sep092014

Men’s Research Study (sexual abuse by a biological mother)

A researcher at the University of Canberra is collecting information from Australian males about males’ experiences seeking and/or receiving counselling for sexual abuse by a biological mother.

This research has been given approval by the University of Canberra’s Committee on Ethical Human Research.

This is a 40-question, online survey.

Your response will be anonymous, and only seen by the researcher and research supervisors.

Practitioners are invited to complete a questionnaire online at http://canberra.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3PH3S8VTl59n5xH. The online survey is now open, until 12 December 2014. This survey focuses on practitioners background and approach to counselling males.

Males who have been sexually abused (possibly still undisclosed) and sought and/or received counselling support are invited to complete their own questionnaire online at http://canberra.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_1zd1ZwJetVexXud. New questions have been added to this survey, as suggested by male victims of sexual assault.

Open from 22 July 2014.

Being part of this research is your choice.

Monday
May122014

Share your story: A safer future for children

The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse is investigating how institutions like schools, churches, sports clubs and government organisations have responded to allegations and instances of child sexual abuse.

In its first 16 months of operation, the Royal Commission has travelled to every state and territory of Australia including many regional areas, to hear from more than 1,500 people in private sessions. The Royal Commission’s call centre has received over 11,000 phone calls from the public and held 11 public hearings.  

Historical data suggests that males were more likely to be sexually abused in institutions than females, and males were also likely to take more than five years longer to report that abuse. 

If you were sexually abused as a child while in the care of an institution in Australia you can share your story with the Royal Commission. It doesn’t matter how young or old you are, or how long ago the abuse occurred, every person’s story is important.

The first step is to let the Royal Commission know that you are interested in sharing your story.

Call: 1800 099 340 between the hours of 8am and 8pm from Monday to Friday

Email: Send an email to contact@childabuseroyalcommission.gov.au

Write: GPO Box 5283, Sydney, NSW 2001.

Discussing child sexual abuse can be difficult. The Royal Commission can refer survivors of child sexual abuse to counsellors or special support groups. 

For more information about the work of the Royal Commission and support services available visit www.childabuseroyalcommission.gov.au or call 1800 099 340.