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Entries in Research (99)

Thursday
Jun092016

Male Health in Australia - A call for action

Despite three decades of adverse statistics, male health policy or rather the lack of it, continues to fail the Australian male

Research continues to demonstrate a disproportionate gender differential in death and illness for males in Australia

The National Male Health Policy (NMHP) released in 2010 lacks endorsement, an action plan or adequate funding by the current Federal Government

The Australian Men’s Health Forum (AMHF) has produced Male Health in Australia A call for action.  Click here to read the eight page paper.

To read a one page summary click here.

The paper is the basis for the call for action that AMHF is making to the political parties.  Click here to read What’s Next?

AMHF has also produced a PowerPoint presentation.  Click here for a copy.

Everyone is encouraged to use these resources during and beyond Men’s Health Week.

AMHF is the peak national forum promoting a social approach to male health and wellbeing.

W: www.amhf.org.au
E: admin@amhf.org.au
P: 0414 950 902.

Tuesday
Mar152016

Fertility and family planning survey

Please click the link below to take part in a survey about Australians' understanding of fertility and attitudes towards fertility testing. The study is being run by Alisha Thompson, Professor Kelton Tremellen and Professor Sheryl de Lacey of Flinders University of South Australia. The survey is open to Australian residents aged between 18 and 45 who do not have children.

Please follow the Survey Monkey link below:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ovarianreservestudy

Ethics approval and an information sheet for participants are also available.

Thank you for donating your valuable time.

Friday
Aug282015

What do you think women’s genitals should look like?

 

What do men think women’s genitals should look like? Why should anyone care?

Because women are having pieces cut off their genitals to make them conform to an idealised standard that’s been likened to a Barbie doll: smooth, hairless, and barely visible.

Do you have preferences for “innies” or “outies”, hair or no hair, and do you tell your partner about your preferences? We would like to invite men (and women) to participate in a national survey about their attitudes to women’s genitals.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Sep092014

Men’s Research Study (sexual abuse by a biological mother)

A researcher at the University of Canberra is collecting information from Australian males about males’ experiences seeking and/or receiving counselling for sexual abuse by a biological mother.

This research has been given approval by the University of Canberra’s Committee on Ethical Human Research.

This is a 40-question, online survey.

Your response will be anonymous, and only seen by the researcher and research supervisors.

Practitioners are invited to complete a questionnaire online at http://canberra.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3PH3S8VTl59n5xH. The online survey is now open, until 12 December 2014. This survey focuses on practitioners background and approach to counselling males.

Males who have been sexually abused (possibly still undisclosed) and sought and/or received counselling support are invited to complete their own questionnaire online at http://canberra.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_1zd1ZwJetVexXud. New questions have been added to this survey, as suggested by male victims of sexual assault.

Open from 22 July 2014.

Being part of this research is your choice.

Sunday
Jun012014

Does men’s health policy deserve our special attention? (Seminar)

Deakin public health policy seminar: DOES MEN’S HEALTH POLICY DESERVE OUR SPECIAL ATTENTION?

The Deakin public health policy seminar series is targeted at senior researchers, academics and policy makers.

Date: Tuesday 10 June 2014 Time: 12pm for 12.30pm until 2pm (sandwich lunch) Location: Conference Room, Deakin City Centre, Level 3, 550 Bourke Street, Melbourne, Victoria, Panelists: Dr Carol Holden, Tass Mousaferiadis, Dr Daniel Perkins

Does men’s health policy deserve our special attention? Despite poorer health outcomes and lower health service engagement there are few specific initiatives focusing on men’s health. Why do men not access healthcare more regularly and should health services do more to improve the engagement of men? Alternatively, why is there a need to focus on men’s health policy separately when the health care system cares predominately for male focussed diseases and chronic conditions?

Click to read more ...