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Entries in Resources: Sexual & Reproductive Health (7)

Tuesday
Apr162013

A Guide to Prostate Cancer and Intimacy

Prostate Cancer and Intimacy: Your Guide to a New Sexual Normal

Returning to sex after prostate cancer can be difficult. Following surgery and radiation treatments, many men experience declines in their sexual function, including impotency and lowered libido. Depending on factors such as age, erectile function before treatment, the type of treatment chosen and the extent of the cancer, the odds of returning to a "normal" sex life are 10 percent to upwards of 70 percent. However, this doesn't mean your sex life is gone — it's just different.

By reading this guide you're taking the first step toward regaining a healthy and satisfying intimate life with your partner. First we'll talk about why prostate cancer treatment so often leads to sexual dysfunction, then we'll look at what you can do to improve your recovery. Next you'll read tips for communication with your partner, and then get a list of questions to ask your doctor.

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Friday
Sep172010

What Men Want — in bed

Sex therapist Bettina Arndt is keen to talk to men’s groups about her new book , What Men Want—in bed, which explains why sex matters so much to men. Over 150 men kept diaries for her, talking about what it is like to live with that constant sparking sexual energy—relentless, uncontrollable, all-consuming. Their painfully honest, confronting, often hilarious stories explain their quest for sexual adventure, their secret delights, longings, frustrations, their fears and their intense joy in making love.

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Saturday
Jun122010

What's happening to our boys?

What kind of world are our boys to growing up in? Why are increasing numbers of boys suffering body image and self-esteem problems? Why do they feel worthless without the latest branded toy, game or item of clothing? What makes soft drinks, snacks and fast foods so attractive? Why are they drawn to countless acts of violence on TV, in movies and in computer games? What impact does our highly sexualised climate, our emphasis on success and money, have on them as they grow? And why are so many boys vulnerable to cyber bullying and to porn? Childhood and teenage life is changing rapidly, leaving parents exhausted and confused as to how best to tackle the many issues they face. How does this high pressure environment affect a boy's confidence, his values and aspirations, his wellbeing, his sense of community, his attitudes to girls and women?

In her follow-up book to What's Happening to Our Girls?, bestselling author Maggie Hamilton asks these and many other vital questions, as well as providing numerous tips for parents and educators on how to create a more promising future for our children. She draws upon interviews with over 70 experts including doctors, psychologists, police and teachers, as well as the 50 anonymous boys themselves to see into their secret lives and understand the challenges they face. What's Happening to Our Boys? is a meticulously researched book that confronts the problems boys and young men face, suggesting positive and constructive ways to help them grow into resilient, productive and happy individuals.

Friday
Mar262010

Oral sex link to head cancer

The number of serious head and neck cancers linked to a virus spread by oral sex is rising rapidly and suggests boys as well as girls should be offered protection through vaccination, doctors said on Friday. Despite an overall slight decline in most head and neck cancers in recent years, cases of a particular form called oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have increased sharply, particularly in the developed world. This growth seems to be linked to cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), the scientists said in a report in the British Medical Journal.

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Friday
Apr032009

Wifely duties spark a firestorm

The sex therapist Bettina Arndt's latest book The Sex Diaries has been selling like hottie-cakes, with 10,000 off the shelves in the first three weeks. Based on the bedroom revelations of 98 Australian couples over six to nine months, it has lifted the lid on the unspoken topic of men and women's biologically mismatched sexual desire. Of course Arndt has been excoriated by feminists for saying that much marital disharmony might be overcome if women just "put the canoe in the water" and start paddling, even if they don't feel like it.

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