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Entries in Resources: Unemployment (4)

Friday
Feb062015

Men, Unemployment and Suicide 2015

The Australian Institute of Male Health and Studies together with the Men's Health Information and Resource Centre at the University of Western Sydney have put together a fact sheet titled Men, Unemployment and Suicide 2015. It contains key points as guidelines for appropriate research and program design pertaining to suicide prevention for men.

Recent international research provides a serious challenge to the general approach to suicide research and prevention, particularly as it applies to men. Current policy and practice are not only unhelpful to many men, but may actually compound the difficulties that men face. Unemployment is a recognised factor in a large percentage of all suicides.

Saturday
Apr192014

Men, Unemployment and Suicide: Australia 2014. A Social and Political Issue - NOT a ‘Mental Health’ Diagnosis

By Anthony Smith, Industry Partner to the NHMRC Center for Research Excellence in Suicide Prevention (CRESP).

This Paper is an extension of an earlier Paper from 2012. A summarised version of the 2012 Paper was published in the Report Obsessive Hope Disorder - Reflections on 30 Years of Mental Health Reform in Australia and Visions for the Future.

Recent research policy and practice around men, unemployment and suicide are highlighted to motivate effective action on this issue. There is now very broad acknowledgement of the particular challenge around unemployment and suicide as it relates to men.

Responsive effective and appropriate action, however, is hard to find.

To read the full article in PDF format, click here.

Sunday
Mar132011

Working with Young Males in Psychotherapy: Implications of the Findings of Boyhood Studies (USA)

Boys are now among the most challenging groups with whom we work as psychotherapists. During the past two decades, boyhood has received special attention, and with good reason: boyhood is being radically redefined. As a result, the number of vulnerable boys who require our attention and care has increased significantly. Some of them are just entering kindergarten; others are graduating from high school or college and manoeuvering their way in a world of work that has increasingly fewer places for them; a decreasing number are in graduate school. Ever more are disconnected, disaffiliated and adrift.

Thursday
May012008

Becoming a Dad: Employment Trajectories of Married, Cohabiting, and Nonresident Fathers

This article considers how becoming a father affects men's employment levels and tests whether the effects of fatherhood differ by the relationship of the father to the child's mother at the time of the birth. Prior to becoming a father, married men worked more hours per week and more weeks per year than cohabiting and nonresident fathers. By five years after the birth, differences in employment between unmarried and married fathers had diminished. The transition to fatherhood is associated with an increase in employment for unmarried fathers but is not associated with significant changes in employment for married fathers.