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Entries in Resources: Young Dads (3)

Tuesday
Aug072012

First-Time Father: The essential guide for the new dad

First Time Father

For many men, the birth of their first child is a truly life-changing event. First-Time Father: The essential guide for the new dad provides fathers with the answers and options to enable them to design a rewarding and effective fatherhood journey.

It seems that what new fathers are wanting has continued to change over the last five years. In this revised edition of First-ime Father, the authors Dr Graeme Russell and Tony White (who both work extensively with new fathers) show that contemporary men want to:

  • have a strong and enduring relationship with their children;
  • be actively involved in the day-to-day care of their children;
  • share the parenting and paid work equally with their partner;
  • take extended leave from paid work to be the primary caregiver for a period of time; and
  • reduce their hours of work (for example, to part-time) to behighly involved in caring for their child.

Click to read more ...

Friday
Mar042011

Fathering in Australia among couple families with young children

There has been growing recognition of the importance of fathers to families in recent years. Societal trends, such as rising levels of employment among mothers of young children and recognition of the importance of the father–child relationship, have given more prominence to the contribution that fathers make to family life. Governments are increasingly interested in creating conditions that can foster fathers’ involvement in families; for example, through promoting more flexible working arrangements or by ensuring that children maintain contact with fathers following family breakdown. This growing interest in the role of fathers has been mirrored in the scientific community. However, there has been a limited amount of research on fathers in Australia, with the result that there remains much to be learnt about the ways that Australian fathers contribute to families and how they feel about themselves as fathers.

This report aims to increase understanding of the many ways in which fathers in couple families with young children contribute to family life, through the study of their time investment with children, their supportiveness as partners, their financial contribution, their parenting behaviours and styles, and their perceptions of their own adequacy as fathers. The impact of fathers on children’s wellbeing is also examined.

Thursday
Jan142010

Like Father, Like Son: The Intergenerational Cycle of Adolescent Fatherhood (USA)

Strong evidence exists to support an intergenerational cycle of adolescent fatherhood, yet such a cycle has not been studied. We examined whether paternal adolescent fatherhood (i.e., father of study participant was age 19 years or younger when his first child was born) and other factors derived from the ecological systems theory predicted participant adolescent fatherhood. Data included 1496 young males who were interviewed annually from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997. Cox regression survival analysis was used to determine the effect of paternal adolescent fatherhood on participant adolescent fatherhood. Sons of adolescent fathers were 1.8 times more likely to become adolescent fathers than were sons of older fathers, after other risk factors were accounted for. Additionally, factors from each ecological domain—individual (delinquency), family (maternal education), peer (early adolescent dating), and environment (race/ethnicity, physical risk environment)—were independent predictors of adolescent fatherhood. These findings support the need for pregnancy prevention interventions specifically designed for young males who may be at high risk for continuing this cycle. Interventions that address multiple levels of risk will likely be most successful at reducing pregnancies among partners of young men.