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Entries in Sexual Abuse & Assault (72)

Tuesday
Dec132016

Award-winning journalist looking to interview male victims of female-perpetrated sexual assault for story

We have been contacted by Ginger Gorman, an award-winning social justice journalist writing for news.com.au.

Ginger wrote to us to ask if we knew of anyone who might be interested in being interviewed by her for a story she's currently working on about women as perpetrators of sexual assault against men.

Are you in this group of men? Would you be willing to share your experience with Ginger? If yes, she would love to hear from you and possibly interview you for her story.

You can contact her at: gingergormanwrites@gmail.com.

Thanks!

Tuesday
Sep092014

Men’s Research Study (sexual abuse by a biological mother)

A researcher at the University of Canberra is collecting information from Australian males about males’ experiences seeking and/or receiving counselling for sexual abuse by a biological mother.

This research has been given approval by the University of Canberra’s Committee on Ethical Human Research.

This is a 40-question, online survey.

Your response will be anonymous, and only seen by the researcher and research supervisors.

Practitioners are invited to complete a questionnaire online at http://canberra.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3PH3S8VTl59n5xH. The online survey is now open, until 12 December 2014. This survey focuses on practitioners background and approach to counselling males.

Males who have been sexually abused (possibly still undisclosed) and sought and/or received counselling support are invited to complete their own questionnaire online at http://canberra.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_1zd1ZwJetVexXud. New questions have been added to this survey, as suggested by male victims of sexual assault.

Open from 22 July 2014.

Being part of this research is your choice.

Saturday
Jun072014

Preventing and Responding to Sexual and Domestic Violence against Men - A Guidance Note for Security Sector Institutions

Large numbers of men are subjected to Sexual and Domestic Violence (SDV). For example, official statistics from Australia estimate that 336,000 men (4 per cent of the male population) have been victims of sexual violence and 448,000 men (5.3 per cent) have been subjected to partner violence since they turned 15 years old. Male victims often share similar security needs with female victims. However, there are also gender-specific barriers to accessing security and justice, and the issue of SDV remains especially shrouded in silence and misconceptions when it comes to male victims. A literature review indicated that while academic research on these topics does exist and several NGOs have recorded relevant good practices, there is currently no single document where this information is synthesised in such a way that it can be readily used by the security sector. This guidance note is therefore designed to serve as a tool to enable security sector institutions to provide a more effective gender-sensitive approach to preventing and responding to SDV against men.

Click to read more ...

Monday
May122014

Share your story: A safer future for children

The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse is investigating how institutions like schools, churches, sports clubs and government organisations have responded to allegations and instances of child sexual abuse.

In its first 16 months of operation, the Royal Commission has travelled to every state and territory of Australia including many regional areas, to hear from more than 1,500 people in private sessions. The Royal Commission’s call centre has received over 11,000 phone calls from the public and held 11 public hearings.  

Historical data suggests that males were more likely to be sexually abused in institutions than females, and males were also likely to take more than five years longer to report that abuse. 

If you were sexually abused as a child while in the care of an institution in Australia you can share your story with the Royal Commission. It doesn’t matter how young or old you are, or how long ago the abuse occurred, every person’s story is important.

The first step is to let the Royal Commission know that you are interested in sharing your story.

Call: 1800 099 340 between the hours of 8am and 8pm from Monday to Friday

Email: Send an email to contact@childabuseroyalcommission.gov.au

Write: GPO Box 5283, Sydney, NSW 2001.

Discussing child sexual abuse can be difficult. The Royal Commission can refer survivors of child sexual abuse to counsellors or special support groups. 

For more information about the work of the Royal Commission and support services available visit www.childabuseroyalcommission.gov.au or call 1800 099 340.

 

Monday
Jul152013

Child sex abuse rampant in Afghanistan, documentary shows | Toronto Star (Canada)

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Supplied photo

A screengrab from a documentary called This is What Winning Looks Like, produced by Ben Anderson. The film looks at the practice of bacha bazi, or "boy play", in Afghanistan.

U.S. Marine Maj. Bill Steuber, like most people in Afghanistan’s southern Helmand province, knew that local Afghan police were keeping young boys as sex slaves.

The practice, known as bacha bazi, or “boy play,” was an open secret in Sangin, a town of 14,000 in Helmand.

So Steuber sat down to confront deputy police chief Qhattab Khan, hoping he could convince him that the practice — which is as illegal in Afghanistan as it is in Canada — would cost the police the support of the local community.

But what Steuber heard left him shaking his head in disbelief.

During their meeting in November 2012, Steuber said, Khan mocked the idea that his men shouldn’t have sex with the boys. Without the boys, Khan said, using graphic language, his men would be left with few options other than their own grandmothers.

Click to read more ...